Feb 2020

The Creation of Leap Year and Its Effects on Genealogy

This Saturday is February 29th, a relatively uncommon occurrence as days go. It’s a leap day in a leap year. Unless you’re like Dinah Shore, Tony Robbins, or Ja Rule, all of whom share a birthday that day, you may not even notice. For the rest of us, it’s a subtle reminder that calendars change. […]
Feb 2020

Little-Used NGS Resources: The Book Loan Collection

I don’t blame you. I really don’t. I’ve never used it myself. So who am I to point a finger? When the National Genealogical Society was founded in 1903 in Washington, DC, it established a library for its members. That library continued to grow for the next 98 years, amassing more than 20,000 volumes of […]
Jan 2020

Hearing Voices

Former NGS board member B. Darrell Jackson had an unusual request for his birthday. He asked his three adult children to read one of the six books he has written on their family history and write about their impressions. His son’s response was particularly thoughtful. I am struck overall about how little we can know […]
Jan 2020

Three Updates at the National Archives

Record Group Explorer The National Archives houses billions of pages of records, a volume so significant that researchers can easily be overwhelmed. A new tool released by the Archives makes it easier to browse those records by record group. The Record Group Explorer first shows record groups organized by volume of textual records, from the […]
Nov 2019

USCIS Fee Hike Proposal

According to Records, Not Revenue, “an ad hoc group of genealogists, historians and records access activists,” U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) recently proposed a 492% increase in fees for historical records held by the USCIS Genealogy Program. Until December 16th only **UPDATE; extended to February 10th**, the Federal Rulemaking Portal is accepting comments from […]
Nov 2019

Highlights from the 2020 Family History Conference Program

I’m not normal; on this I’m clear. But for reasons that remain a mystery, I take an inordinate amount of pleasure from opening up a conference program for the first time, perusing the pages, and marking the presentations that catch my attention (in red ink, no less). Some lectures I mark because they address a […]
Oct 2019

Land Evidences and Geographic Clues: Mapping As a Research Tool

It’s probably our most common research problem: A variety of records contain the same name; do those records refer to one person or to two or more? I’ve referred in the past to examples of solutions that differentiated men of the same name, including “Untangling the 15 Henry Hoffs of York County.”[1] There are instances, […]
Oct 2019

Sheriffs and Other Grantors You Should Know

You’re stuck. You were tracing your ancestor’s land ownership, and everything was going just fine. He bought; he sold; he bought; he sold; he bought again . . . but when and where is the sale of that last tract? It’s clear he didn’t own the land when he wrote his will, so what happened […]
Sep 2019

Non-Population Census Schedules

Every genealogist works with federal census population schedules. Our work with them is so common that we generally don’t even bother to specify that they’re population schedules. They’re just “the census.” Far fewer of us make full use of the federal censuses. We know, at least in theory, that there are other schedules out there, […]
Sep 2019

Cause of Death Decoder

Just as we in the field of genealogy have a friend in Steve Morse and the “One-Step” pages that facilitate effective searches of passenger lists, censuses, vital records, and more, so the scientific, technical, and medical research community have a friend in Wolfbane Cybernetic, a Scotland-based tech firm providing “modern solutions to modern problems.” One […]